Current affairs

by Sue Konzelmann and Marc Fovargue-Davies  |  18th September 2019

David Cameron’s recent description of the government’s management of the Brexit process as “restrictive and counter productive” could equally well have been applied to his government’s programme of austerity, which started in 2010 – and for most of us, is still rumbling on. After almost a decade of austerity, during which growth has sputtered, poverty Read More

image of a crowd
by Sue Konzelmann John Weeks and Marc Fovargue-Davies  |  13th September 2019

Of the nineteen UK governments since the Second World War, only two have torn up the rule book and tried to build a better future, instead of simply recycling the tired slogans and policies of the past. The two governments that did try radical change, not always successfully, were those of Clement Attlee in 1945 Read More

by Mark Featherstone  |  3rd September 2019

In a world marked by political and economic uncertainty, debt appears to be a constant, an enormous dark cloud weighing upon our lives. We are always in debt, struggling to make ends meet, maintain repayments, and balance the books. In the wake of financial crash of 2008 debt was big news and many imagined the Read More

On 5 August, Narendra Modi’s newly reelected government announced that it was revoking Article 370 of the Indian Constitution, which conferred special status on the state of Jammu and Kashmir. It declared that it intended to split that state into two parts, render the area of Ladakh and what was left of Jammu and Kashmir Read More

by Norman Gowar  |  15th August 2019

Not for the first time the issue of post A-level results applications to university is in the news, this time as a promise from Labour that it would introduce such a scheme. Norman Gowar, co-author of English Universities in Crisis, highlights how this change would improve participation. Arguments against are familiar and seem feeble: lack Read More

We are in the midst of a pervasive sense of crisis, which for many of us feels overwhelming. The growth of precarious work and automation, accompanied by deep and systemic poverty, along with crises around migration and the environment present an uncertain future. Here, Tom Vickers, author of Borders, Migration and Class in an Age Read More

Extra-curricular activities are crucial for nurturing children’s ‘softer’ skills outside the classroom. However, our recent Social Mobility Commission report highlights a dearth of opportunities for young people in some communities, meaning many will spend the next six weeks with little to do. Extra-curricular activities have made it onto the government’s agenda in recent months. Activities Read More

Member states of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) met for the 34th ASEAN Summit last month in Bangkok. The two-day summit is held annually, providing an opportunity for Southeast Asian leaders to meet to discuss socio-political, economic and security issues impacting the region. One contentious topic for discussion was ASEAN’s role in the Read More

This weekend it’s Bristol Pride Day. June and July have seen celebrations of the LGBT+ community around the world. To mark the occasion, Bristol University Press and Policy Press are showcasing some of the important research we have published in this area.  Take a look here. These journal articles are free to read until 21 Read More

by Sally Tomlinson  |  8th July 2019

What stories will the British, or more particularly, the English, tell themselves about their country and identity, once Brexit has been enacted? It is doubtful whether the 1922 creation of a United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland will endure. Ireland, colonised by the English in 1169, is an independent country remaining in the Read More