Impact

by Paul Williams  |  8th November 2019

Based on Middle Managers as Agents of Collaboration by Paul Williams, this briefing covers policy recommendations around the role, behaviours and management practices of middle managers working in collaborative environments – complex settings that require cross boundary governance, management, policy and practice. Download the PDF here.   Middle Managers as Agents of Collaboration, by Paul Read More

by Richard Freeman  |  24th October 2019

Previously published on the Policy & Politics blog. What do policy makers do? The question is important, because making policy engages a great number of people one way or another, and what they do they might do well or badly. Our standard answers are rather hazy, not least because policy making entails such great numbers Read More

by Julia Mortimer  |  22nd October 2019

Happy Open Access Week! At Bristol University Press and our imprint Policy Press we have long been supporters of responsible and fair Open Access (OA). We are proud of our positive relationship with the academic community we serve, and we want our authors’ work to gain as wide a readership as possible. OA fundamentally supports Read More

Philip Alston talks with local residents

Research having an impact on policy, and the wider world, can be extremely hard to quantify, but on occasion we find an example that illustrates the great potential we have to make a difference. …Read more

image of a crowd
by Sue Konzelmann John Weeks and Marc Fovargue-Davies  |  13th September 2019

Of the nineteen UK governments since the Second World War, only two have torn up the rule book and tried to build a better future, instead of simply recycling the tired slogans and policies of the past. The two governments that did try radical change, not always successfully, were those of Clement Attlee in 1945 Read More

by Larissa Pople and Sorcha Mahony  |  12th September 2019

In this episode we tell Amara’s story, about her dreams, and how fragile these are when your childhood is overshadowed by debt. Amara’s story is followed by a discussion between the authors of the book, Sorcha Mahony and Larissa Pople, along with Sam Royston, all from The Children’s Society, and Jess Miles, from Bristol University Read More

by Sorcha Mahony and Larissa Pople  |  29th August 2019

In this podcast we’re telling Alex’s story, about debt, grief and loss, and how life can spiral out of control. This is the second in a series of podcasts that examines what life is like for families stuck in problem debt. The stories are taken from Life in the Debt Trap by Sorcha Mahony and Larissa Read More

by Robert McLean  |  21st August 2019

Based on Gangs, Drugs and (Dis)Organised Crime by Robert McLean, this briefing covers contemporary British gang activity at all levels with an emphasis on involvement in organised crime, and in particular the illegal supply of drugs. Policy recommendations include addressing the root causes of crime, adopting a strategy of support for members rather than gang Read More

by Sorcha Mahony and Larissa Pople  |  15th August 2019

What is life like for families who are stuck in problem debt? Why do they fall into a spiral of debt in the first place, and why is it so hard to escape? This podcast tells Stella’s story, about debt and isolation, and the impact that debt has across the whole family. This is the Read More

Children carrying grasses what makes evidence useful
by Andrew Dawes and Paul Dornan  |  13th August 2019

What matters most in how poverty shapes children’s wellbeing and development? How can data inform social policy and approaches to improving outcomes for poorer children? What makes evidence useful? Young Lives has contributed powerful findings on the multiple impacts of poverty on the young. Using life course analysis from the Young Lives study of 12,000 Read More