Social and Public Policy

by Paul Stubbs  |  1st November 2019

Paul Stubbs is a UK-born sociologist and currently a Senior Research Fellow in the Institute of Economics, Zagreb, Croatia. Here he looks at the work of Stuart Hall, and how John Clarke, author of Critical Dialogues: Thinking Together in Turbulent Times, built on this to guide us through spatio-temporal shifts in the UK and beyond, Read More

by Richard Freeman  |  24th October 2019

Previously published on the Policy & Politics blog. What do policy makers do? The question is important, because making policy engages a great number of people one way or another, and what they do they might do well or badly. Our standard answers are rather hazy, not least because policy making entails such great numbers Read More

Philip Alston talks with local residents

Research having an impact on policy, and the wider world, can be extremely hard to quantify, but on occasion we find an example that illustrates the great potential we have to make a difference. …Read more

Extra-curricular activities are crucial for nurturing children’s ‘softer’ skills outside the classroom. However, our recent Social Mobility Commission report highlights a dearth of opportunities for young people in some communities, meaning many will spend the next six weeks with little to do. Extra-curricular activities have made it onto the government’s agenda in recent months. Activities Read More

by Alison Shaw  |  4th July 2019

It is that time of year again when we are out at conferences, meeting our authors, editors, readers and making new connections. At these events, we’re often asked about becoming Bristol University Press and where Policy Press now fits. When we launched Policy Press (PP) in 1996, our very first conference was the Social Policy Read More

by Karen Passmore  |  11th June 2019

I knew I was transgender from about the age of four, even though the word did not exist then. I knew I was a girl, even though I had a boy’s body. You couldn’t talk about how you felt, tell others you were really a girl, when everything about you said the opposite.…Read more

by Judith Orr  |  29th May 2019

The new ban on abortion in Alabama takes millions of women across the US a step closer to losing fundamental rights to control their fertility. But we also have an Alabama situation on our own doorstep,: it’s called Northern Ireland. …Read more

by Alice Harper  |  21st May 2019

Following the publication of The End of Aspiration by Duncan Exley, Alice Harper, a recent graduate, speaks about her experience of expectation, aspiration and finding a job after graduation. Having attained an education to be proud of, I had high expectations of myself as a graduate. It turns out that being able and willing to Read More

The UK, in the post-war decades, saw a remarkable degree of upward social mobility, with large numbers of people getting higher-status jobs than their parents had at the same age. The decline of social mobility since then has prompted some to say that it has ‘ground to a halt’, which isn’t at all true:  there Read More

by Sandra Nutley, Alec Fraser, Huw Davies and Annette Boaz  |  7th May 2019

How has the role of evidence in policy and practice changed in the last 20 years? Recent events such as Michael Gove’s claim that we have “had enough of experts” and the prevalence of fake news create a sense that decision makers apparently choose not to take academic research into account. But there is hope. Read More