Sociology

by Sarah Nash  |  16th September 2019

With the Global Climate Strike starting on Friday, this week we’re bringing you articles on climate change from Bristol University Press authors. Here, Sarah Nash, author of Negotiating Migration in the Context of Climate Change, explains the need to disentangle the relationships between phenomena such as human mobility and climate change in order to bring Read More

Social scientists aren’t always very good at remembering their own history. Also, their research doesn’t build as intelligently on what has gone before, as research in some other disciplines. This means that texts which were trail-blazing and influential at the time, and which are still relevant today, can be forgotten unless active attempts are made Read More

by Mark Featherstone  |  3rd September 2019

In a world marked by political and economic uncertainty, debt appears to be a constant, an enormous dark cloud weighing upon our lives. We are always in debt, struggling to make ends meet, maintain repayments, and balance the books. In the wake of financial crash of 2008 debt was big news and many imagined the Read More

by Sara Eldén and Terese Anving  |  6th August 2019

Does the practice of hiring nannies and au pairs challenge inequalities in and between families, or does it reproduce them? Sara Eldén and Terese Anving, the authors of the first book in the Sociology of Children and Families series, Nanny Families: Practices of Care by Nannies, Au Pairs, Parents and Children in Sweden, answer this Read More

We are in the midst of a pervasive sense of crisis, which for many of us feels overwhelming. The growth of precarious work and automation, accompanied by deep and systemic poverty, along with crises around migration and the environment present an uncertain future. Here, Tom Vickers, author of Borders, Migration and Class in an Age Read More

by John Clarke  |  15th July 2019

Thinking critically is a demanding challenge, especially in these hard times. This blog celebrates the practice of thinking collaboratively and dialogically, drawing on Mikhail Bakhtin’s persistent concern with ‘dialogism’ and ‘heteroglossia’ as vital and productive features of social life. Critical thinking should never be a lonely experience. Even if I am not engaged directly in Read More

by Mary Mellor  |  25th June 2019

What does money mean? Where does it come from and and is it really in short supply? Most importantly, should the creation and circulation of money be a matter of democratic choice? Listen to Mary Mellor, author of Money: Myths, Truths and Alternatives, part of our British Sociological Association 21st Century Standpoints series, examine money’s Read More

Informal refugee camps in and around Calais may no longer be in the news but the problem is far from solved. In this impact case study, Sarah Mallet shows how her book, Lande: The Calais Jungle and Beyond, co-written with Dan Hicks, and the corresponding exhibition at the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford, create a Read More

by Sarah Breaux  |  19th June 2019

Sarah Breaux, Senior Executive Assistant at Bristol University Press, shares her thoughts on The Right Amount of Panic by Fiona Vera-Gray. Reading this book enabled me to think back on my experiences as a woman and evaluate the evolution of my behaviour over time. I had never thought about it as a continuous aspect of Read More

by Mary Holmes, Åsa Wettergren and Nathan Manning  |  6th June 2019

This week Bristol University Press proudly launches the first issue of Emotions and Society. Editors in Chief Mary Holmes and Åsa Wettergren, and Co-Editor Nathan Manning introduce the inaugural issue out now. With a sense of amused irony, the editorial team have reflected on the highly emotional, as well as long intellectual and administrative journey Read More