Democracy, power and security

by Janet Newman  |  14th October 2019

John Clarke’s book, Critical Dialogues: Thinking Together in Turbulent Times, celebrates the productive possibilities of what he terms ‘thinking together’. His work can be used to challenge the idea of identity as singular, fixed and immutable – an idea in which people are assumed to have their own, unique, authentic identity, and to belong to Read More

by Ian Hall  |  25th September 2019

The weekend’s Howdy Modi rally in the US is significant not only because it represents Modi’s ongoing attempts to woo the Indian diaspora, from whom a significant amount of his support comes, but also his reliance on personal diplomacy. This may have won favour with Trump but with other leaders, Modi has had more mixed Read More

by Sue Konzelmann  |  18th September 2019

David Cameron’s recent description of the government’s management of the Brexit process as “restrictive and counter productive” could equally well have been applied to his government’s programme of austerity, which started in 2010 – and for most of us, is still rumbling on. After almost a decade of austerity, during which growth has sputtered, poverty Read More

On 5 August, Narendra Modi’s newly reelected government announced that it was revoking Article 370 of the Indian Constitution, which conferred special status on the state of Jammu and Kashmir. It declared that it intended to split that state into two parts, render the area of Ladakh and what was left of Jammu and Kashmir Read More

by Mary Mellor  |  25th June 2019

What does money mean? Where does it come from and and is it really in short supply? Most importantly, should the creation and circulation of money be a matter of democratic choice? Listen to Mary Mellor, author of Money: Myths, Truths and Alternatives, part of our British Sociological Association 21st Century Standpoints series, examine money’s Read More

by Judith Orr  |  29th May 2019

The new ban on abortion in Alabama takes millions of women across the US a step closer to losing fundamental rights to control their fertility. But we also have an Alabama situation on our own doorstep,: it’s called Northern Ireland. …Read more

by Annette Boaz, Huw Davies, Alec Fraser and Sandra Nutley  |  7th May 2019

How has the role of evidence in policy and practice changed in the last 20 years? Recent events such as Michael Gove’s claim that we have “had enough of experts” and the prevalence of fake news create a sense that decision makers apparently choose not to take academic research into account. But there is hope. Read More

by Claire Ainsley  |  14th March 2019

Claire Ainsley's The New Working Class: How To Win Hearts, Minds and Votes was published by Policy Press in May 2018. It’s been especially interesting seeing how people from all over the political spectrum have seen the opportunities for their side to use the new knowledge to their own advantage.…Read more

by Henry Tam  |  26th February 2019

Bristol University Press talks to Henry Tam, a leading expert on the threats against democracy and what should be done to counter them. …Read more

As the gap continues to widen between citizens and the political institutions that are meant to govern on their behalf, many people are losing faith in democracy, while large numbers are turning to authoritarian demagogues to lead the way. The only remedy for the growing distrust and discord is to rebuild cooperation between state and citizens.…Read more