Poverty, wealth and inequality

by Alison Shaw  |  4th July 2019

It is that time of year again when we are out at conferences, meeting our authors, editors, readers and making new connections. At these events, we’re often asked about becoming Bristol University Press and where Policy Press now fits. When we launched Policy Press (PP) in 1996, our very first conference was the Social Policy Read More

by Vedat Akgiray  |  1st July 2019

Can financial systems restore social and economic justice in societies? This short video, adapted from Good Finance by Vedat Akgiray, introduces the book and begins to explore ways in which our current concept of finance can be revised for the good of society. Good Finance, by Vedat Akgiray is available on the Policy Press website. Order here Read More

by Ashok Rathod  |  4th June 2019

Sharing means saving future generations; if we offer better education, children can grow up to be good human beings, making a positive contribution to the world. When my best friend was 11, he dropped out of school to work. He spent his money on drinking, gambling and smoking. I was lucky, my father encouraged me to study. …Read more

by Nick Gallent  |  23rd May 2019

In 1973, Horst Rittel and Melvyn Webber published a paper in Policy Sciences contrasting the ‘tame’ problems of science (resolvable through the calm application of scientific rationality) with the ‘wicked’ problems of the social world. One of the ten reasons why social problems are often wicked – difficult to decode and resistant to any solution Read More

Occasionally a story is reported in the news that provokes a public response, stimulating discussion, particularly on social media, and prompting other similar follow up news stories. One such story emerged recently when it was reported in The Guardian that a housing developer in South London (Henley Homes) had developed segregated play areas at its Read More

by Mary O'Hara  |  26th April 2019

Early in my career when I was a rookie reporter, a good while before I began writing about poverty, a conversation took place that keeps coming back like a niggling alarm on snooze.…Read more

I was born in Chelmsford in Essex and grew up in Heybridge, near Maldon, on a council estate with my mum. I remember a girl who went to my school. Her parents were both artists and they talked about her going to university. It was worlds away from my life. I wasn’t told that I could be anything.…Read more

It feels like a lifetime ago that austerity was the primary catastrophe facing the country. And yet, objectively, this is far from the case. Austerity is alive and kicking.…Read more

by Corrine Jones  |  2nd January 2019

I lived in Grenfell Tower on the 17th floor. It was my first permanent property in 10 years. Everything was temporary before that. I never felt comfortable sleeping in my room. I never thought of a fire, but the silver cladding on the building just reminded me of the Twin Towers. In the night, I used to wake up sometimes just thinking something would happen, and have that panic inside of me.…Read more

by Kayleigh Garthwaite  |  14th July 2018

Kayleigh Garthwaite's Hunger Pains was published in 2016 by Policy Press, and won the British Academy Peter Townsend Prize 2017. Kayleigh has presented the work to cross-party MPs in a launch event in Parliament, given talks to sixth form students, spoken at the House of Lords, and to trade union groups.…Read more