Poverty, wealth and inequality

by Roger Brown  |  28th October 2019

In this long read, Roger Brown, author of The Inequality Crisis: The Facts and What We Can Do About It, outlines causes of the Neoliberal turn and shows how it has created vastly increased and unjust social inequality. Crucially, he explains where we need to begin in order to reverse the tide. In November 1984, Read More

Philip Alston talks with local residents

Research having an impact on policy, and the wider world, can be extremely hard to quantify, but on occasion we find an example that illustrates the great potential we have to make a difference. …Read more

by Sue Konzelmann  |  18th September 2019

David Cameron’s recent description of the government’s management of the Brexit process as “restrictive and counter productive” could equally well have been applied to his government’s programme of austerity, which started in 2010 – and for most of us, is still rumbling on. After almost a decade of austerity, during which growth has sputtered, poverty Read More

image of a crowd
by Sue Konzelmann John Weeks and Marc Fovargue-Davies  |  13th September 2019

Of the nineteen UK governments since the Second World War, only two have torn up the rule book and tried to build a better future, instead of simply recycling the tired slogans and policies of the past. The two governments that did try radical change, not always successfully, were those of Clement Attlee in 1945 Read More

by Larissa Pople and Sorcha Mahony  |  12th September 2019

In this episode we tell Amara’s story, about her dreams, and how fragile these are when your childhood is overshadowed by debt. Amara’s story is followed by a discussion between the authors of the book, Sorcha Mahony and Larissa Pople, along with Sam Royston, all from The Children’s Society, and Jess Miles, from Bristol University Read More

Social scientists aren’t always very good at remembering their own history. Also, their research doesn’t build as intelligently on what has gone before, as research in some other disciplines. This means that texts which were trail-blazing and influential at the time, and which are still relevant today, can be forgotten unless active attempts are made Read More

by Mark Featherstone  |  3rd September 2019

In a world marked by political and economic uncertainty, debt appears to be a constant, an enormous dark cloud weighing upon our lives. We are always in debt, struggling to make ends meet, maintain repayments, and balance the books. In the wake of financial crash of 2008 debt was big news and many imagined the Read More

by Sorcha Mahony and Larissa Pople  |  29th August 2019

In this podcast we’re telling Alex’s story, about debt, grief and loss, and how life can spiral out of control. This is the second in a series of podcasts that examines what life is like for families stuck in problem debt. The stories are taken from Life in the Debt Trap by Sorcha Mahony and Larissa Read More

by Norman Gowar  |  15th August 2019

Not for the first time the issue of post A-level results applications to university is in the news, this time as a promise from Labour that it would introduce such a scheme. Norman Gowar, co-author of English Universities in Crisis, highlights how this change would improve participation. Arguments against are familiar and seem feeble: lack Read More

by Sorcha Mahony and Larissa Pople  |  15th August 2019

What is life like for families who are stuck in problem debt? Why do they fall into a spiral of debt in the first place, and why is it so hard to escape? This podcast tells Stella’s story, about debt and isolation, and the impact that debt has across the whole family. This is the Read More