Poverty, wealth and inequality

by Nick Gallent  |  23rd May 2019

In 1973, Horst Rittel and Melvyn Webber published a paper in Policy Sciences contrasting the ‘tame’ problems of science (resolvable through the calm application of scientific rationality) with the ‘wicked’ problems of the social world. One of the ten reasons why social problems are often wicked – difficult to decode and resistant to any solution Read More

by Mary O'Hara  |  26th April 2019

Early in my career when I was a rookie reporter, a good while before I began writing about poverty, a conversation took place that keeps coming back like a niggling alarm on snooze.…Read more

I was born in Chelmsford in Essex and grew up in Heybridge, near Maldon, on a council estate with my mum. I remember a girl who went to my school. Her parents were both artists and they talked about her going to university. It was worlds away from my life. I wasn’t told that I could be anything.…Read more

It feels like a lifetime ago that austerity was the primary catastrophe facing the country. And yet, objectively, this is far from the case. Austerity is alive and kicking.…Read more

by Corrine Jones  |  2nd January 2019

I lived in Grenfell Tower on the 17th floor. It was my first permanent property in 10 years. Everything was temporary before that. I never felt comfortable sleeping in my room. I never thought of a fire, but the silver cladding on the building just reminded me of the Twin Towers. In the night, I used to wake up sometimes just thinking something would happen, and have that panic inside of me.…Read more

by Kayleigh Garthwaite  |  14th July 2018

Kayleigh Garthwaite's Hunger Pains was published in 2016 by Policy Press, and won the British Academy Peter Townsend Prize 2017. Kayleigh has presented the work to cross-party MPs in a launch event in Parliament, given talks to sixth form students, spoken at the House of Lords, and to trade union groups.…Read more

Stephen Crossley discusses the National evaluation of the Troubled Families Programme 2015 to 2020 interim findings, 'dirty data', his approach and methodology and the purpose of academic research.…Read more

by Lee Gregory  |  14th May 2018

Lee Gregory discusses the ideological and conceptual issues surrounding welfare debates.…Read more

by Peter Dwyer and Sharon Wright  |  14th November 2017

The Journal of Poverty and Social Justice published Universal Credit, ubiquitous conditionality and its implications for social citizenship by Peter Dwyer and Sharon Wright which was referenced in the Universal Credit Roll-out Emergency Debate on 24 October 2017 by Neil Gray (SNP).…Read more

In the foreword to 'Dead-End Lives', Professor Dick Hobbs introduces Daniel Briggs and Rubén Monge Gamero's research into Valdemingómez, Madrid, and what it reveals about the post-industrial city.…Read more