Poverty, wealth and inequality

Street art saying 'Trouble is my business'
by Stephen Crossley  |  20th January 2020

Following the announcement of £165 million extra funding for the Troubled Families Programme, Stephen Crossley, author of 'Troublemakers’, reminds us that we have yet to see any significant impact on most of the ‘complex inter-connected problems’ it has allegedly been tackling.…Read more

Photo of a child sat on a bench with a teddy bear in hand
by Morag Treanor  |  16th January 2020

Morag Treanor, author of Child Poverty: Aspiring to Survive, looks at how the Conservative government's lack of pledges to mitigate the effects of social security cuts will increase, not just levels of poverty for children, but consequent problems for them in relation to health, wellbeing, family stress and physical safety, among other issues.…Read more

Two homeless men sat on a bench, provided by Julian House
by Jessica Gay  |  16th December 2019

Jessica Gay, Senior Community and Events Fundraiser at Julian House, a homeless charity based in Bath, shows how the charity offers direct support through projects and services which not only address the symptoms of homelessness but also the underlying reasons why men and women are forced onto the streets. Julian House is Bristol University Press's chosen charity for 2020.…Read more

Street art of cans in style of Tesco saying 'Tories value - cream of foodbank soup'

Sue Konzelmann shows why the next government, which will be faced with the consequences of a decade’s worth of cuts, should not focus on 'where’s the money coming from?' but ask the question 'where’s our society and economy going?'.…Read more

Photo of a sign saying 'Polling station'

After a year characterised by political uncertainty, one thing that seems clear during this election campaign is that the two largest parties have their work cut out to build enough support to achieve a clear majority. British politics is experiencing an unprecedented level of fragmentation. Traditional divides along the lines of class are blurring, as Read More

Street art of Jeremy Corbyn with the initials JC on either side
by Danny Dorling  |  13th November 2019

The extract below from Peak Inequality, published in 2018, sums up the conclusion to that book and remains pertinent today. Jeremy Corbyn, like all of us, may have many faults, but he also epitomises both something that is fundamentally decent and the possibility for change. It is significant that elections are held in December in Read More

Illustration of two men at ladders, one is missing rungs, from the cover of 'The Inequality Crisis'
by Roger Brown  |  28th October 2019

In this long read, Roger Brown, author of The Inequality Crisis: The Facts and What We Can Do About It, outlines causes of the Neoliberal turn and shows how it has created vastly increased and unjust social inequality. Crucially, he explains where we need to begin in order to reverse the tide. In November 1984, Read More

Philip Alston talks with local residents

Research having an impact on policy, and the wider world, can be extremely hard to quantify, but on occasion we find an example that illustrates the great potential we have to make a difference. …Read more

by Sue Konzelmann  |  18th September 2019

David Cameron’s recent description of the government’s management of the Brexit process as “restrictive and counter productive” could equally well have been applied to his government’s programme of austerity, which started in 2010 – and for most of us, is still rumbling on. After almost a decade of austerity, during which growth has sputtered, poverty Read More

image of a crowd
by Sue Konzelmann John Weeks and Marc Fovargue-Davies  |  13th September 2019

Of the nineteen UK governments since the Second World War, only two have torn up the rule book and tried to build a better future, instead of simply recycling the tired slogans and policies of the past. The two governments that did try radical change, not always successfully, were those of Clement Attlee in 1945 Read More