Social justice and equal opportunity

This weekend it’s Bristol Pride Day. June and July have seen celebrations of the LGBT+ community around the world. To mark the occasion, Bristol University Press and Policy Press are showcasing some of the important research we have published in this area.  Take a look here. These journal articles are free to read until 21 Read More

by Alison Shaw  |  4th July 2019

It is that time of year again when we are out at conferences, meeting our authors, editors, readers and making new connections. At these events, we’re often asked about becoming Bristol University Press and where Policy Press now fits. When we launched Policy Press (PP) in 1996, our very first conference was the Social Policy Read More

by Iman Bibars  |  2nd July 2019

Wanting to change the world was not common in Egyptian culture. I went into the poorest areas, where the women ‘waste pickers’ were collecting garbage. I wanted to work with them as they have nothing. If their husband dies, leaves them, or disappears, they either have to get remarried or become a prostitute and the kids become destitute. They have no choice. I wanted to help them have a choice.…Read more

by Sarah Breaux  |  19th June 2019

Sarah Breaux, Senior Executive Assistant at Bristol University Press, shares her thoughts on The Right Amount of Panic by Fiona Vera-Gray. Reading this book enabled me to think back on my experiences as a woman and evaluate the evolution of my behaviour over time. I had never thought about it as a continuous aspect of Read More

by Berni Graham and Louca-Mai Brady  |  18th June 2019

Capturing the voices, views and experiences of children and young people directly and involving them more actively in the research process are increasingly seen as essential for good social research, evaluation, policy and service development. Often, the perspectives of children and young people are filtered through the interpretations of adults: with either parents or carers Read More

by Karen Passmore  |  11th June 2019

I knew I was transgender from about the age of four, even though the word did not exist then. I knew I was a girl, even though I had a boy’s body. You couldn’t talk about how you felt, tell others you were really a girl, when everything about you said the opposite.…Read more

by Nick Gallent  |  23rd May 2019

In 1973, Horst Rittel and Melvyn Webber published a paper in Policy Sciences contrasting the ‘tame’ problems of science (resolvable through the calm application of scientific rationality) with the ‘wicked’ problems of the social world. One of the ten reasons why social problems are often wicked – difficult to decode and resistant to any solution Read More

by Alice Harper  |  21st May 2019

Following the publication of The End of Aspiration by Duncan Exley, Alice Harper, a recent graduate, speaks about her experience of expectation, aspiration and finding a job after graduation. Having attained an education to be proud of, I had high expectations of myself as a graduate. It turns out that being able and willing to Read More

The UK, in the post-war decades, saw a remarkable degree of upward social mobility, with large numbers of people getting higher-status jobs than their parents had at the same age. The decline of social mobility since then has prompted some to say that it has ‘ground to a halt’, which isn’t at all true:  there Read More

Discover 7 ways employers can help tackle the class ceiling in this short video, taken from The Class Ceiling by Sam Friedman and Daniel Laurison: