Social justice and equal opportunity

by Paul Stubbs  |  1st November 2019

Paul Stubbs is a UK-born sociologist and currently a Senior Research Fellow in the Institute of Economics, Zagreb, Croatia. Here he looks at the work of Stuart Hall, and how John Clarke, author of Critical Dialogues: Thinking Together in Turbulent Times, built on this to guide us through spatio-temporal shifts in the UK and beyond, Read More

by Roger Brown  |  28th October 2019

In this long read, Roger Brown, author of The Inequality Crisis: The Facts and What We Can Do About It, outlines causes of the Neoliberal turn and shows how it has created vastly increased and unjust social inequality. Crucially, he explains where we need to begin in order to reverse the tide. In November 1984, Read More

by Julia Mortimer  |  22nd October 2019

Happy Open Access Week! At Bristol University Press and our imprint Policy Press we have long been supporters of responsible and fair Open Access (OA). We are proud of our positive relationship with the academic community we serve, and we want our authors’ work to gain as wide a readership as possible. OA fundamentally supports Read More

by Zoe Young  |  10th October 2019

Zoe Young, author of Women’s Work: How Mothers Manage Flexible Working in Careers and Family Life speaks to Jess Miles about work-life balance being an unattainable dream and how choice is an illusion for professional mothers. They discuss how policy and organisation change can make flexible working arrangements ‘work’ for women and families, and for Read More

Philip Alston talks with local residents

Research having an impact on policy, and the wider world, can be extremely hard to quantify, but on occasion we find an example that illustrates the great potential we have to make a difference. …Read more

image of a crowd
by Sue Konzelmann John Weeks and Marc Fovargue-Davies  |  13th September 2019

Of the nineteen UK governments since the Second World War, only two have torn up the rule book and tried to build a better future, instead of simply recycling the tired slogans and policies of the past. The two governments that did try radical change, not always successfully, were those of Clement Attlee in 1945 Read More

Extra-curricular activities are crucial for nurturing children’s ‘softer’ skills outside the classroom. However, our recent Social Mobility Commission report highlights a dearth of opportunities for young people in some communities, meaning many will spend the next six weeks with little to do. Extra-curricular activities have made it onto the government’s agenda in recent months. Activities Read More

This weekend it’s Bristol Pride Day. June and July have seen celebrations of the LGBT+ community around the world. To mark the occasion, Bristol University Press and Policy Press are showcasing some of the important research we have published in this area.  Take a look here. These journal articles are free to read until 21 Read More

by Alison Shaw  |  4th July 2019

It is that time of year again when we are out at conferences, meeting our authors, editors, readers and making new connections. At these events, we’re often asked about becoming Bristol University Press and where Policy Press now fits. When we launched Policy Press (PP) in 1996, our very first conference was the Social Policy Read More

by Iman Bibars  |  2nd July 2019

Wanting to change the world was not common in Egyptian culture. I went into the poorest areas, where the women ‘waste pickers’ were collecting garbage. I wanted to work with them as they have nothing. If their husband dies, leaves them, or disappears, they either have to get remarried or become a prostitute and the kids become destitute. They have no choice. I wanted to help them have a choice.…Read more